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"Vassar College" Burges Johnson Clipped Signature Dated 1929 Todd Mueller COA For Sale



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"Vassar College" Burges Johnson Clipped Signature Dated 1929 Todd Mueller COA:
$199.99

Up for sale"Vassar College" Burges Johnson Clipped Signature Dated 1929. This item is certified authentic by Todd Mueller Autographs and comes with their Certificate of Authenticity.
ES-4300E

Born in Rutland, Vermont, on November 19, 1877, Burges Johnson was the third of four children of Reverend James Gibson Johnson and his wife Mary, who interested her son in literature at a young age. In his memoirAs Much As I Dare(1944), he recalled their nighttime reading sessions. “I wonder how many thousands of pages our mother read aloud to us four youngsters throughout our childhood. Bible stories, fairy tales, thrillers inSt. Nicholas, and books without number.… The low rocker in which she sat is today my most treasured bit of furniture; and I can almost regain at times that all-pervading sense of perfect comfort when a light burns bright after I am in bed, and the silence means she might at any moment begin a story.” His early love of literature matured as he attended school in New London and later Chicago before enrolling at Amherst College to study English. In 1899, he graduated from Amherst with a B.A. degree. He was awarded an honorary Litt. D. from the college in 1924. On June 14, 1904, Johnson married Constance Wheeler, the daughter of the former president of the New York Bar Association, Everett P. Wheeler. The couple had three children, Mary, James and Miriam, and they wrote a number of books together includingYearbook of Humor(1910) andParodies for Housekeepers(1921). Johnson began his career in journalism, atThe New YorkCommercial AdvertiserandThe New York Evening Post. He then entered the publishing world, working at G.P. Putnam’s Sons and Harper & Brothers. He also held positions as assistant editor atEverybody’s Magazine, managing editor atOutdoor Magazine, editor-in-chief atJudge Magazineand president at Thompson Brown & Co. publishers. Although very devoted to his work as a publisher, Johnson recalled in his memoir his growing interest in academia: “Now and then during those Harper days, after I had married and when I visited one college campus or another, I would hear the faint voices of those many Yankee ancestors who had been teachers and preachers hinting that an academic life had many advantages for a family man.” In 1914 Johnson mentioned this notion to Henry Noble MacCracken, a witnesses for an E.P. Dutton & Co. suit involving its book seriesEveryman’s Library. An English professor at Smith College, MacCracken had long usedEverymantitles for his courses. The two discussed a job offer Johnson had received from Columbia University to work in its new journalism school as a part-time instructor. MacCracken advised Johnson to turn down the instructor position and wait for an opportunity that would grant him a more appropriate position. In December 1914 MacCracken was named to succeed James Monroe Taylor as president of Vassar, and in his first official act after he assumed the office on February 1, 1915, he offered Johnson a teaching position at the college, writing to him: “If you are seriously thinking about the possibility of teaching, why not come up here? We will allow you to go to New York for half of the week, and we will treat you better at Vassar than Columbia would.” MacCracken was particularly interested in hiring Johnson because of his experience in journalism and, by extension, public relations. In a 1914Vassar Miscellanyarticle, Elizabeth Hazelton Haight ‘94, the chairman of the newly formed Publicity Committee of the Alumnae Council, had outlined Vassar’s plans to develop a publicity department similar to those at Smith, Mount Holyoke and Wellesley, to include not only the chair of the Publicity Committee but also members of the student Press Board: “The committee hopes that after a year, it may be able to report that more students are writing for papers, that many more newspapers are regularly printing news (and significant news) of Vassar college, that special articles on the educational policies of the college and on its inner life are appearing and that the alumnae at large are cooperating with it in helping to distribute news of the college to the press and in sending back news of themselves to the college.”


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